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CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 12:00pm EDT
compromise and more about having it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies that show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having everyone be insured as a society and what as a society do we gain from that, what is the consequences if we don't? it's been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science has really been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. and that's a scary moment regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal or legal beliefs are about that. to require medical professionals to mislead their patients is not where we should be as a country, and i think those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 5:00pm EDT
read the potomac institute, for those of you that have not been here before, is a science and technology not for profit policy think tank if you will win the washington, d.c. area that focuses on how science and technology affect the national security. for quite some time we have studied issues in and around what people callasymmetric threats and most importantly, terrorism. this past year professor alexander and i released our second volume on al qaeda about 11 years after the first volume on al qaeda right before 9/11, and we would like to call your attention to it. there are copies available year and of course available on the web at amazon always good things and i want to highlight it today because it is more of a gift we are going to give to our panel members for taking the time of their busy schedules to the very least i can promise you a good sleep if you read it. [laughter] the second look at the potomac institute has been involved in over this past year is an effort with the bechtel corporation to look at the cyber issue, in particular the seibu doctrine. that volume
CSPAN
Sep 27, 2012 9:00am EDT
. come on. this is not rocket science. it is hard political work. the political will to meet the needs of children whose needs have never been matched is hard. >> come in. >> richard's argument is frustrating and personal honestly because their statistical likelihood of graduating high school would be less than 50% and we can say that is okay and we are making progress. that is not okay. we have to take a totally different look at what we're doing in public education and rethink it and say how the we take what we found in small isolated pockets and figure out how to get them to millions of kids who need them and that is a massive challenge. none of us are underestimating the size of this challenge. i am trying to argue we have indications of what those elements are. in new york city public schools from k-12 the personal the likelihood of me graduating with a diploma was 5%. five% of kids graduated special-education students from new york city public schools and i went on to graduate from high school and had great teachers and great principles. that should not determined by a lottery or
CSPAN
Sep 26, 2012 9:00am EDT
that, and it follows the social science victims that the best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. so, you know, a as a wire servie that i'm normally into prognostication business but i feel very safe going out on a limb today. eight months ago in the state of the union speech, obama issued an appeal to congress to spend more federal money on construction projects that would generate jobs. what he said was, take the money we are no longer spending it for, use half of the to pay down our debt and use the rest to do some nationbuilding right here at home. well, we pointed out in a fact check that night the fallacy of that idea. the idea that some kind of budget surpluses going to be created when you stop the war is fiscal fiction. those wars have been primarily financed by borrowing. so if you stop the wars, you don't have pneumonia. you just have less borrowing, must debt being added. it doesn't create a pool of ready cash, and on top of that the supposed savings of this supposed peace dividend is inflated because it's based on spending numbers that are extrapolated into t
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 9:00am EDT
2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. prior to starting that he led the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education bill bennett. he also served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. i'm sure all of you see built regularly on "fox news sunday" and the fox news channel. i actually met bill in 1981 when he was a very young, assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he has accomplished since that time. so the questions i'd like to pose for each of you come and i'll start with governor huntsman, what does the 2012 election reveal about the respected leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much at this point. >> well, this panel is over. [laughter] >> see you later.
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 12:00pm EDT
had the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i s
CSPAN
Sep 28, 2012 12:00pm EDT
-chaired the defense science energy security task force with jim schlesinger and i currently just been named the technical cochairman of the chief of naval operations vulnerability on energy security and i would like to talk about, first of i like to take the opportunity say that, the states and ferc on electricity and energy regulation, the states regulate almost exclusively for rate, rates, not for reliability at all. and ferc regulations are, they can take effect after a process that takes four to six years. in light of the rate of threat which is something else i wanted to talk about, we have no effective regulatory system. so i'm particularly concerned about sif and particularly concerned about cyber and i, i would like to call into question the perishability of cyber solutions. the lot of the discussion today, which i completely agree with all of it, focused on the cyber solutions to the cyber problems but i would like to point out that because of the rate of the threat, particularly with the bad actors, we might think about dumb solutions and i wanted your thoughts on this, such
CSPAN
Sep 27, 2012 12:00pm EDT
substitute for those who have not been here before, is a science and technology, not for profit policy think tank, if you will for the washington, d.c., area that focuses on how science and technology affects our national security. for quite some time, we have been involved in the study of issues in and around what people call acementic threats. and most importantly terrorism. this past year, professor al sander an i realize released our second volume on al qaeda about the first volume on al qaeda right before 9/11. i would like to call your attention to it. there are copies available here and on the web and amazon. all the good things. i want to highlight it today. it's one of the gifts we are going to give to the members for takes the time out of their busy schedule to join us today. i can patrol you a good sleep if you read it. [laughter] the second work that the institute has been evolved in is the wefort the corporation to look at the cyber issue in particular cyber doctorate. that volume ed kitted by tim and i is in publication as we speak. so you a short flier of that sum
CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 5:00pm EDT
doctrine. the third conversation has been published and every like to possessors of political science speculating in the abstract about the nature of international politics. you may wonder why it was because of fact the only thing worth talking about was at that point whether we could establish enough confidence between the two of us to risky adventure that opening to china representative for both sides shown that point of view, from a domestic, political point of view. and even though the subject of president nixon to china, was the reason why i came, neither side mentioned it until about 12 hours before. i mention not only to say i believe it should be followed to get your object it straight before you start haggling about details. we had no choice. now every generation and then was a great reform and i cannot think of any other country where you could definitely say that the evolution that we have seen in the last 30 years, depending on the vision of one man, as in the case of no other chinese who had the vision and the courage to move china into the imaginative system and to engag
CSPAN
Oct 2, 2012 12:00pm EDT
and ranking member of the house, science, space, and technology committee as well as a confer rei on -- conferee on the faa committee, i realize making the skies safer, less congested, and cleaner requires substantial investments. we must invest in the future, but we have to invest wisely. i'm concerned with the department of transportation, inspector general's april 2012 # report that the en route implementation schedule slipped by four years, and over budgeted by $330 million. in addition, i understand that although progress is being made, the agency has had difficulties in developing performance metrics for next generation goals. i want to thank you chairman petri and ranking member costillo, for holding the hearing, and i look forward to the testimony of the witnesses today because i believe we have to implement the next generation technology. thank you, and i yield back. >> thank you, and now we turn to the first panel, and i'd like to welcome the honorable john portcari, the u.s. secretary of the department of transportation, the acting administrator of the faa. welcome to both
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 8:30am EDT
for patients and good for science going forward so this is the one thing that didn't make it. the other little thick that didn't make it is now the safe dosage act, passed in the last minute, by the senate, and that's awaiting the president's signature, but one of the things that's necessary in terms of the resources is that this has to be a global enterprise. one of the things that is happening globally is the leading pharmaceutical companies in the united states, in europe, in japan have banded together to work with interpol to ensure they have enough resources to go after the bad guys around the world, and we've just started that. i think we're going to kick that off here next month. we've been discussing this with interpol, and we think we have a good program to help country's specific enforcement agencies with the global respective of interpol. yes, it costs money. it is money well spent, but more importantly, it gets us the heart of the trust that patients have to have in our medicines. >> ralph, i know as we've worked on the partnership and built it up over the years, a lot
CSPAN
Sep 28, 2012 9:00am EDT
director of georgetown's institute for law, science and global security. and i apologize if i butchered your last names. we will correct that in the feeds. >> it's great to be with all of you this morning i want to issue an apology if any of you are a twitter follower of mine. i have about 11,000 of them, and i guess yesterday they all got a little telling them that it just seemed and in this fantastic video. if you just clicked right your they could see it. at i think there is of a thousand friends, cycling through, this is the first time, it's ironic that i've ever fallen for one of the sort of cyber gags. i don't know what information they got from the, but nonetheless i wanted to kind of mentioned it and out myself as someone who is falling prey to the very folks out in cyber land. we have with us as mentioned katherine as executive director of georgetown institute for law, science and global security. she directs the global, george and cybersecurity project, and she also interestingly in the past, work with someone i'm well acquainted with, brent scowcroft from 2002-2006
CSPAN
Sep 28, 2012 5:00pm EDT
sciences to assess the ability of the united states to monitor compliance with the treaty and the ability of the united states to maintain in the absence of nuclear explosive testing of safe and secure and effective nuclear arsenals so long as these weapons exist. those reports on the related material will provide a wealth of information as the senate considers the merits of the ratification of the ctbt. of course we do not expect people to be in the preseason only mode. we anticipate and look forward to many substantive questions and items of discussion and debate that will undoubtedly come from our colleagues from capitol hill. looking upward from the administration has been calling on all the remaining to join us in moving forward towards ratification. there is no reason for them to delay their own ratification process waiting for the united states to ratify. the administration realizes this will be a difficult task on many levels, but it is nonetheless committed to moving the treaty for word so as the national security of the united states and all states will be enhanced when
CSPAN
Sep 26, 2012 12:00pm EDT
johnson will be our get -- guest next month. the science writer and columnist for discover magazine will look at the cyberworld popular culture and computer networking and politics. lives in their october 7 at noon eastern on c-span2 book tv. up next, a debate between kendis to be the next governor of new hampshire. the republican candidates unsuccessfully ran for governor in 1996 and was the republican nominee for the u.s. senate in 2010. democrat is a former new hampshire state senator who served as the majority leader. this took place in manchester, new hampshire and comes to us from new hampshire public broadcasting and is about an hour. >> welcome to the candidates' forum on business and the economy. i am most of the exchange. we are coming to you from the television studios at the new hampshire is to to the politics that political library. for the next hour we will hear from new hampshire is gubernatorial candidates. we will press them to talk about what they would do as governor and refrain from spending valuable time attacking each other. and now let me introduce our candid it's.
CSPAN
Sep 25, 2012 5:00pm EDT
other thing, the importance of improving standards in the schools at all levels, particularly science and math standards because we need to make sure that our young people are not only getting a good education in those areas, but have hand-on curriculum, and that means we want to invest in the university, begin restoring cuts that the legislature made, but in exchange for that, freezing tuition at the university system, and also making sure that the university system is holding more slots open for new hampshire residents to families can afford to stay here and kids stay here to be the next generation of talent for our economy. >> good morning. >> tell me about your policy economic differences. >> well, thank you very much, first of all, not new hampshire public radio and new hampshire public television for spoon storing the first debate of the general election cycle, and i'm pleased to speak with the various media. i think the policy differences are fundamental and they are vast. when it comes to jobs in the economy and reforming state government, and that's what is on the forefront o
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15